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6 Tricky Spiders that Make Funnel Webs

Spiders that make funnel webs are also called funnel-web spiders. Some of the spiders that make funnel webs include Agelenidae spiders, funnel-web tarantulas, including Dipluridae, Hexathelidae, Nemesiidae, Macrothele, and Porrhothele.

6 Tricky Spiders that Make Funnel Webs

Funnel-web spiders are known for the distinctive funnel-shaped webs that they make. These spiders usually create this funnel-shaped web at the top of a small plant, bush, or grass.

The reason that the webs are shaped like funnels is to catch prey and to protect the spider from predators. This web catches and holds prey and also protects the spider from its predators.

The spiders that make this type of web usually sit in the middle of their funnel-shaped web and wait for insects or other small animals to become trapped or caught in the web’s sticky substance. 

If you’re suffering from a spider bite, please consult a medical professional. This website is for entertainment only. We’re not medical professionals and you shouldn’t use this site to try to identify or diagnose any spider or spider bite.

Spiders that Make Funnel Webs

Here are the most common spiders that make funnel webs. There are two major spider groups that create funnel webs: Agelenidae, and funnel-weaving tarantulas.

1. Agelenidae 

Spiders from the family of Agelenidae spiders are commonly called funnel-web spiders. The best-known Agelenidae is the Sydney funnel-web spider. This spider is found in Eastern Australia. Other Agelenidae spiders include lace-web spiders and grass spiders.

These spiders are some of the most venomous and vicious spiders in the world. They will create funnel webs. They are the most poisonous spider in Australia which is why they are highly feared.

The funnel webs serve the purpose of allowing them to stay safe from predators, but also to catch their prey. When an animal gets stuck inside the funnel-web, the spider will attack it. The spider will inject venom into the animal which can paralyze or kill it.

The most common species from the Agelenidae family of spiders that create funnel webs is the Hololena curta, or the corner funnel weaver.

This spider will create funnels in corners where the webs will protect them and allow them to catch insects that get caught inside the funnel-web.

They have a potent venom, which will paralyze their prey and allow them to consume their prey with ease.

2. Funnel-Web Tarantulas

tarantula

Even some tarantula species will create funnel webs. Inside the tarantula family of spiders (Mygalomorphae), there are several subspecies that like to create funnel webs.

Because some of these spiders are highly popular among pet owners, you might own one of these spider species that create funnel webs. 

Read More: Do Tarantulas Spin Webs?

1. Atracidae (Australian Funnel-web spiders)

The atracidae is one of the most common tarantula species in Australia. This spider is commonly found in Northern Australia and is regarded as the most venomous spider in the world.

This spider is generally nocturnal and will make its web at night when not much light is available. 

These spiders spin their webs in the middle of the funnel web. When an insect gets caught in their web, they will attack them and inject venom which will paralyze them to eat their prey. 

The venom from this spider can also be used against their predators if they find themselves in danger.

Generally, the funnel-web will keep them protected and it will allow them to survive attacks from predators.

Read More: How Do Spiders Eat Their Prey?

2. Dipluridae (Curtain-web spiders)

The Dipluridae spider likes to create curtain-like webs, but might sometimes also create a funnel web. This type of web is important to them because it will keep them alert if another animal gets stuck inside the web.

This spider belongs to the group of Mygalomorphae, which means that they are technically tarantulas. The Dipluridae spider is found in Australia, Oceania, and some islands in the Caribbean as well as parts of Asia and South America.

Related Article: Are There Spiders With Wings?

3. Hexathelidae

Hexathelidae is also referred to as “six-eyed spiders.” They often create funnel webs and will often create silk sheets around the funnel-web. These webs will protect them and allow them to catch prey and stay safe from predators.

This spider can be found in many parts of Australia as well as New Zealand, Central America, and some islands in the South Pacific. They are also present in additional parts of Asia. 

The spider is mostly brown and will have six eyes, which are typically red in color. Their fangs point straight down, which is a feature that is typical for most Mygalomorphae spiders.

They also have venom that they’ll use against the animals that get stuck inside their webs, which will paralyze them.

4. Nemesiidae

Nemesiidae is also known as funnel-web trapdoor spiders because of their funnel web. This spider creates an entry point against the ground, where it will create a funnel web. This web will help them protect themselves from predators. 

They are found in Australia, Borneo, India, New Guinea, Sri Lanka, South Africa, the West Indies, and the United States of America, but also in parts of Europe such as Portugal and the south of Europe.

5. Macrothele

Macrothele is a genus of spiders that belongs to Macrothelidae. These spiders belong to the larger group of Mygalomorphae.

This spider is known for its ability to create funnel webs. They like to create these webs under rocks and other parts of the habitat that might be hidden, which gives them more stealth and it allows them to stay hidden from their predators, too.

6. Porrhothele

Porrhothele, which belongs to the group of spiders called Porrhothelidae, is a spider that will create a funnel web, as well as a burrow. This spider will create a burrow in the ground and they’ll use their venom to catch prey.

They are also known as burrowing wolf spiders because they do tend to make their burrows in the ground.

These spiders are typically found throughout Australia, but can also exist in parts of New Zealand, Southeast Asia, India, South America, and some islands in the Pacific Ocean.

Read More: 15 Types of Spider that live in Hawaii

Conclusion

There are many different spiders that create funnel webs. These webs are some of the most efficient and deadliest types of webs, and many of the spiders that create these types of webs carry very potent venoms, too.

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