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21 Animals Like Badgers (A to Z List with Pictures)

21 Animals Like Badgers

Examples of animals like badgers include weasels, ferrets, stoats, polecats, mink, martens, wolverines, fishers, skunks, and otters.

Mustelids are the most numerous and diverse of the Carnivora family. There are 65 distinct species in this category, which include weasels, badgers, ferrets, stoats, polecats, mink, martens, wolverines, fishers, skunks, and otters.

They can be found on every continent except Antarctica, and their habitats range from forests to tundra to deserts.

Badgers are one of the most easily identifiable animals in the United States. They have a distinctive black and white striped back, and a small head with a short snout. However, there are several other animals that share these same physical characteristics, so it can be tricky to tell them apart.

In this blog post, we will take a look at some of the animals that people often mistake for badgers.

Examples of Animals that Look Like Badgers

1. African Civet

Scientific NameCivettictis civetta
Type of AnimalMammal
Rangesouthern and central Africa

The African civet is a large mammal that looks somewhat like a cross between a cat and a raccoon. It has a long body, short legs, and a striped coat. African civets are found in Africa, where they inhabit forests and woodlands. They are nocturnal animals and spend most of their time in trees. African civets are not closely related to badgers, but they do share some physical similarities.

2. American Mink

American Mink
Scientific NameNeovison vison
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeNorth America

Minks are small, sleek, semiaquatic creatures with dark brown fur and a white underbelly. They are members of the weasel family, and their closest relatives are otters and stoats. Minks are native to North America, and they can be found in every US state except Hawaii. Minks are solitary animals, and they are most active at night. They are excellent swimmers, and they often hunt for fish, frogs, and crayfish in streams and ponds.

3. American Polecat

American Polecat
Scientific NameMustela nigripes
Type of AnimalMammal
Rangecentral North America

The American polecat is also known as the black-footed ferret. It is a small, carnivorous mammal that is native to North America. Polecats are members of the weasel family, which includes animals such as minks, otters, and wolverines. They have a long, slender body with short legs and a pointed face. Their fur is brown or yellowish-brown in color, and they have black feet.

4. Asian Palm Civet

Asian Palm Civet
Scientific NameParadoxurus hermaphroditus
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeIndia, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka

The Asian palm civet is a small, stocky mammal that is found in southeastern Asia. They have a black and white striped coat, and a short snout. Asian palm civets are often mistaken for badgers because of their physical similarities. However, there are some key differences between the two animals. For one, palm civets are much smaller than badgers. They also have a long, ringed tail, whereas badgers do not.

5. Banded Mongoose

banded Mongoose
Scientific NameMungos mungo
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeAfrica

The banded mongoose is a small mammal that is native to Africa. They are closely related to meerkats and look very similar to them. Mongooses are small animals with long bodies and short legs. They have a pointed snout and large ears. Banded mongooses have a stripe of darker fur running down their backs. They are about the same size as a badger and can weigh up to 10 pounds.

6. Black Mongoose

Black Mongoose
Scientific NameGalerella sanguinea
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeAfrica

One of the animals that are often confused for a badger is the black mongoose. This is because they share many of the same physical characteristics, such as the black and white striped back.

However, there are some key differences that can help you tell them apart. For one, black mongooses have a longer snout and smaller ears. They also have a long tail that is often held upright when they are walking. Finally, the black mongoose is native to Africa, while badgers are found in North America.

7. Black‑Footed Ferret

Black‑Footed Ferret
Scientific NameMustela nigripes
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeWyoming, South Dakota, Montana and Arizona

The black-footed ferret is a small carnivore that is native to North America. It’s a species in the genus Mustela and is closely related to other mustelids such as weasels, otters, and minks. The black-footed ferret is the size of a house cat, with a long body and short legs. It has a black mask around its eyes, and its fur is mostly brown or tan, with black feet and a black-tipped tail.

Related Article: Can Black-Footed Ferret See in the Dark?

8. Common Dwarf Mongoose

Common Dwarf Mongoose
Scientific NameHelogale parvula
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeSomalia and Ethiopia to eastern South Africa and Namibia

The common dwarf mongoose is a small mammal that is native to Africa. It is one of the most commonly mistaken animals for a badger, due to its similar appearance. The main difference between the two animals is that the dwarf mongoose has a long tail, while the badger does not.

9. Eastern Spotted Skunk

Eastern Spotted Skunk
Scientific NameSpilogale putorius
Type of AnimalMammal
Range North America

The eastern spotted skunk is a small, stocky mammal with short legs and a long body. It has black fur with white spots on its back, sides, and head. It also has two stripes that run down its back from its head to its tail. The eastern spotted skunk is about the same size as a badger, but it has a much more slender body.

10. Egyptian Mongoose

Egyptian Mongoose
Scientific NameHerpestes ichneumon
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeAfrica

The Egyptian mongoose is a small mammal that is closely related to the meerkat. It is about the size of a domestic cat and has a long body with short legs. It is covered in short, bristly fur that is usually yellowish-brown or grey in color.

11. European Mink

European Mink
Scientific NameMustela lutreola
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeEastern Europe (Romania, Russian Federation, Ukraine) and Spain and France

The European mink is a small carnivorous mammal of the mustelid family. Mustelids also include weasels, otters, and ferrets. The European mink is the only member of the genus Mustela that is found in Europe.

The European mink has a long, slender body with short legs. It is brown or black in color with a light-colored underbelly. European minks can grow to be about 20 inches long and weigh up to 2 pounds.

12. European Polecat

European Polecat
Scientific NameMustela putorius
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeNorth Africa and western Eurasia

The European polecat is a mustelid that is found throughout Europe and parts of Asia. It is about the same size as a badger and has a similar black and white striped back. However, the European polecat has a long, skinny body, and its head is much more elongated than that of a badger.

13. Fishers

Fisher
Scientific NamePekania pennanti
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeNorth America

Fishers are often mistaken for badgers because of their similar appearance. They have a small head, short legs, and a long body covered in dark brown fur. However, fishers are actually members of the weasel family. They are significantly smaller than badgers, weighing only 3-6 pounds. Fishers also have a bushy tail, while badgers have a short stubby tail.

14. Irish Stoat

Scientific NameMustela erminea hibernica
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeIreland

The Irish stoat is a member of the mustelid family, which includes weasels, otters, and ferrets. It is native to Ireland and can be found in other parts of Europe and Asia. Some Irish stoat has a black and white striped back, just like a badger. It also has a small head with a short snout. The Irish stoat is smaller than a badger, however, and its fur is red on the sides and belly.

15. Malayan Civet

Scientific NameViverra tangalunga
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeIndonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines

The Malayan civet (Hemigalus derbyanus) is a small carnivore that is found in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. It has a black and white striped coat and a long body with short legs. While it may resemble a badger, it is actually more closely related to the mongoose.

16. Marsh Mongoose

Scientific NameAtilax paludinosus
Type of AnimalMammal
Rangesub-Saharan Africa

The Marsh Mongoose is a small mammal that is found in Africa, specifically in marshy areas. It has a long body and a short tail, and its fur is brown or grey in color. The Marsh Mongoose is often mistaken for a badger because of its physical appearance, but it is actually more closely related to the cat family.

17. Masked Palm Civet

Masked Palm Civet
Scientific NamePaguma larvata
Type of AnimalMammal
Rangesouthern and Southeast-Asia

The masked palm civet (Paguma larvata) is a small, nocturnal mammal that is found in forests throughout Southeast Asia. It gets its name from the black mask-like markings around its eyes. The rest of its body is covered in short, dark fur. Masked palm civets are about the same size as a domestic cat, and they have a long tail that is nearly as long as their body.

Palm civets are good climbers, and they spend most of their time in trees. They eat fruits, insects, and small animals. Palm civets are sometimes hunted for their meat, but they are also captured and sold as pets.

18. Meerkat

Meerkat
Scientific NameSuricata suricatta
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeAfrica

The meerkat is a small mammal that is native to Africa. It is closely related to the suricate and the mongoose. Meerkats are easily recognizable by their striped coats and long tails. They live in burrows and are very social animals, often living in groups of up to 30 individuals. Meerkats are known for their ability to stand upright on their hind legs and look around for predators. This behavior is known as “sentinel duty.”

While meerkats may resemble badgers in some ways, they are actually quite different animals. For one thing, meerkats are much smaller than badgers, averaging only about 2 pounds in weight. They also have different diets, with meerkats eating mostly insects and small reptiles. Lastly, meerkats are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day, while badgers are nocturnal animals that sleep during the day and come out at night to hunt.

19. Otter Civet

Otter Civet
Scientific NameCynogale bennettii
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeSoutheast Asia and Indonesia

The otter civet (Cynogale bennettii) is a member of the Mustelidae family, which includes weasels, stoats, ferrets, and wolverines. It is native to Southeast Asia and can be found in countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand

20. Striped Skunk

Striped Skunk
Scientific NameMephitis mephitis
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeNorth America from southern Canada into northern Mexico

The striped skunk is the most common type of skunk in North America. It gets its name from the black and white stripes that run down its back. These animals are about the same size as a badger, and they also have small heads with a short snout. The biggest difference between these two animals is that skunks can spray a foul-smelling liquid from their anal glands as a form of self-defense.

21. Wolverines

Wolverine
Scientific NameGulo gulo
Type of AnimalMammal
RangeCanada and Alaska

The wolverine is the largest member of the weasel family. It is a stocky and muscular animal with short legs, large feet, and a bushy tail. Wolverines are dark brown or black in color, and they have a light-colored stripe running down their backs. They are found in forested areas of North America, Europe, and Asia.

Wolverines are often mistaken for badgers because of their similar appearance. However, wolverines are much larger than badgers, and they have longer legs and a wider heads. Wolverines also do not have the characteristic black and white stripes on their back.

Conclusion

Animals like badgers are not just in North America and Africa. They can be found all over the world, including Asia, Europe, Australia, and South America. There is a variety of animals that share some physical similarities to badgers but also have key differences such as size or habitat preferences.

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